Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Brown and Danson (2008) Fresh talent or cheap labour? Accession State migrant labour in the Scottish economy Brown and Danson (2008) explore the role EU Accession States migrant workers play in Scotland’s economy. The study begins by providing background to schemes such as the now-defunct Scottish Executives Fresh Talent Initiative, before a detailed presentation of the demographics of migrant workers to Scotland and associated labour market characteristics. In addition to exploring related public policy, Brown and Danson examine the demand for migrant workers and reflect upon how they might impact upon the Scottish economy. The study highlights the reality for many migrant workers who are well qualified or skilled, yet gain only low-paid or low-skilled employment in Scotland’s labour market. The study also highlights the problematic aspect of this feature of migrant labour, that it is a barrier to long-term settlement. Although a discussion and analysis of migration in the context of the Scottish economy and labour market, the articles relevance stretches beyond Scotland, to the UK and Europe. Read More Visit site Free EU Scotland Journal article
Glasgow Housing Association (2008) Housing migrant workers: the impact on GHA From 2004 onwards, Glasgow Housing Association (GHA) has experienced an increase in demand for its homes and housing services from migrant workers. GHA therefore commissioned this study to better understand the needs of its newly arrived population. Migrants’ experiences of GHA housing provision are presented and discussed. The report also seeks to ascertain how GHA and other Local Housing Organisation services have been impacted by immigration. With a specific focus on A8 migrants to Glasgow, the study explores the impact on operational management experienced by these organisations when housing such a diverse group of workers with diverse linguistic and cultural characteristics. Although most A8 migrant workers opt for private rented accommodation, the study found that GHA housing was regarded as a more affordable and secure housing choice, and that such choice plays a key role when it comes to decisions regarding long-term settlement. Read More Visit site Free EU Glasgow City Third sector
Guma, Taulant (2015) The ethnicisation of need: questioning the role of ethnicity in the provision of support and services for post-accession migrants in Glasgow This policy paper focuses on the role that ethnicity played in the provision of support and services for post-accession migrants living in Glasgow, based on intensive ethnographic fieldwork conducted throughout 2012 with Czech- and Slovak-speaking migrants living in the city. It is based on the PhD research project ‘Everyday negotiations of in/securities and risks: an ethnographic study amongst Czech- and Slovak-speaking migrants in Glasgow’ which was co-funded by the ESRC and Glasgow City Council. The paper argues that using ethnicity as a straightforward, ‘naturally existing’ category and making it a requirement for individuals’ access to certain services has problematic implications for affected migrants as well as service providers and policy-makers. Read More Visit site Free EU, A8 Glasgow Academic research
Kozłowska, Sallah, Galasiński (2008), Migration, Stress and Mental Health: An Exploratory Study of Post-accession Polish Immigrants to the United Kingdom This study addresses a gap in the literature on mental health of post-accession Polish migrants to the United Kingdom. It was designed in response to an influx of migration from the ‘new’ to ‘old’ European countries and the first reports indicating distress among these migrants (Healthcare Commission, 2005 and 2006). This report presents prevalence of mental distress among these migrants and the pressure points threatening their mental well-being. Read More Visit site Free EU UK Research Report
Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) Recent Migration into Scotland: The Evidence Base This National Institute of Economic and Social Research publication authored by Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) reviews evidence from a wide range of sources (published and unpublished, qualitative and quantitative) to assess the impact of migration to Scotland since 2004. In addition to assessing the impact of A8 migrants, the report also considers the impact of the arrival of refugee and asylum seekers. The authors assess the impact of these immigration flows in economic, employment and social spheres. The report finds that the statistical data that is available is rather limited. In addition, the authors identify a number of gaps where information needs to be improved. Additional research is particularly needed in the domains of health, education, crime, children and social care. In order to effectively inform policy, more information is required on barriers to accessing employment, migrant access to services and the catalysts and barriers to community integration. The study reflects the fact that migration does increase demand for public services but it also acknowledges migration’s central role in the Scottish Government’s economic strategy. Read More Visit site Free A8, Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Scottish Government