Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Bowes et al. (2008) Asylum policy and asylum experiences – interactions in a Scottish context The work of Bowes et al. (2008) focuses on local and sub-national levels in contrast to the pre-eminence of state and international level analysis evident in other research on the topic of asylum. This view is taken in recognition of the influence that local and sub-national conditions can have on policy. The study rests on research completed in post devolution Scotland and presents an interesting reflection on how asylum and migration policies (in terms of control) at the local and individual level are affected by existing tensions. Including the views of asylum seekers, providers and community groups, the central aim of this study is to demonstrate the sometimes contradictory nature of local level processes in relation to control over asylum seekers, on the one hand fostering new communities while on the other facilitating exclusion. See also Lewis (2006) who examines attitudes found within Scotland towards asylum seekers and refugees; and Sim and Bowes (2007) who explore the experience of asylum seekers in Glasgow. Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Journal article
MOVING ON? DISPERSAL POLICY, ONWARD MIGRATION AND INTEGRATION OF REFUGEES IN THE UK Since 2000, the UK has operated compulsory dispersal, a policy designed to ‘spread the burden’ of housing asylum seekers who require accommodation across the UK and to discourage long-term settlement in London and the South East. To enhance understanding of refugee integration, this research discusses the two-year (2012–14), ESRC-funded project, in which the geography of onward migration amongst refugees dispersed across the UK as asylum seekers was mapped. The findings are based on 83 in-depth interviews with refugees, analysis of Refugee Integration and Employment Service (RIES) client data (2008–11) and analysis of the Home Office Survey of New Refugees (SNR) data (2005–09) for four different sites across the UK: Glasgow, Cardiff, Manchester and London. The report explores the main factors that influence refugees’ decisions to stay in a town or city or move on and considered how this affects the process of integration. Finally, the report examines the policy implications for the different levels of government, service providers and the voluntary sector of the long-term impact of UK dispersal policy on refugee onward migration and integration. The report weaves together quantitative and qualitative data analysis findings to address key questions surrounding refugee onward migration and integration outcomes. Read More Visit site UK Research Report
Mulvey (2010) When policy creates politics: The problematizing of immigration and the consequences for refugee integration This article by Mulvey (2010) presents the argument that the problems of integration for migrants, in particular asylum seekers and refugees, stems from a hostile political environment. The author contends that asylum seekers were firstly constructed as a threat by way of New Labour asylum policy and associated rhetoric that accompanied policy-making – such construction presented immigration as a problem and in turn created a sense of crisis within the domain of policy making – in turn the author argues, the crisis then fostered hostility within the general population towards migrants. This article clearly highlights the importance of the consideration of context in examining the policy-making processes of Government, and that the way policy is made is central to how it is subsequently received by the public. See also Bowes et al. (2008) for another study which assesses asylum policy and asylum experiences in a Scottish context, and Lewis (2006) who examines attitudes found within Scotland towards asylum seekers and refugees. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, Asylum seeker UK Journal article
Stewart and Mulvey (2014) Seeking safety beyond refuge: the impact of immigration and citizenship policy upon refugees in the UK This article is about the impact of UK Government policies on refugees and on citizenship of refugees experiences living in Scotland. The paper examines the impact of the current asylum regime and citizenship policies on refugees themselves. The authors seek to understand how policies impact refugees everyday lives and those of their children. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker Scotland Journal article