Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Shubin (2012a) Living on the move: Mobility, religion and exclusion of Eastern European migrants in rural Scotland In this study of transnational mobility, Shubin (2012a) focuses on the importance of spirituality to Eastern European migrants in rural Scotland. The author argues that an understanding of the spirituality of the migrant group is key to bridging the social gaps created by migration. Rural institutions - including the church – often neglect this aspect of migrant identity. Recognition of the migrants’ spirituality is seen as integral to tackling migration-induced community division and, to the construction of new social environments. Also see Shubin (2012b) which finds that churches’ failure to consider the complexities of migration experiences of Eastern European migrants is inhibiting integration and Shubin and Dickey (2013) who explore the interplay between migrant mobility and employment of Eastern European workers across Scotland. Also see Shubin (2011) on the impact of an itinerant lifestyle and Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) on addressing marginalisation within the school environment. Read More Visit site £ EU Scotland Journal article
Shubin (2012b) The Church and mobility: Dealing with the exclusion of Eastern European migrants in Rural Scotland Shubin (2012b) argues that rural institutions and the church often fail to recognise the complexities of migration as experienced by Eastern European migrants to Scotland. As a result, these institutions can be slow to recognise and support migrants’ needs. This failure can inhibit integration and lead to exclusion. The research takes account of the intricacies of migrants’ wider social links alongside their own support strategies and networks. The article provides an interesting account of ways in which the church in Scotland might explore its own role in the process of encouraging migrant inclusion. In addition, the church, together with other rural institutions, can make pro-active changes which would demonstrate an appreciation of the migrant experience. Ultimately, such steps could empower marginalised communities in Scotland’s rural areas. Also see the study by Shubin (2012a) which focuses on the importance of spirituality to Eastern European migrants in rural Scotland. Read More Visit site £ EU Scotland Journal article
Snyder (2011) Un/settling Angels: Faith-based organizations and asylum-seeking in the UK Snyder (2011) investigates the rationale behind Church support for people seeking asylum in Scotland. The author also discusses the challenges and impediments such faith-based organisations face when attempting to provide such support. The study centres on three key aspects of religious organisations’ activities in relation to their work with asylum seekers. These are transcendent motivation, organisation and strategies and mobilisation of resources. The study reviews the aspects of support the Church provides to aid settlement. Pastoral care, worship and advocacy aimed to help new arrivals settle are discussed in addition to church-led efforts designed to question negative attitudes, raise awareness and influence Government policy. By exploring how churches work with people seeking asylum, the study contributes to the under-researched area of the role played by faith-based organisations in supporting new arrivals to the UK. The research demonstrates the strong contribution churches make to the provision of support for asylum seekers. The author proposes that more work needs to be done to explore non-Christian engagement in this area. Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker, Refugee UK Journal article