Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

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Hopkins (2008) Race, nation and politics: the difference that Scotland makes Hopkins (2008) draws attention to the distinct differences found in Scotland on matters of race and racism and contrasts these with the views held elsewhere in the United Kingdom. In a review of past research, the author firstly outlines the similarities that can be found within both the Scottish and UK contexts prior to highlighting differences that are evident. One of the key differences found is that of diversity. Scotland is home to far less diversity and distribution within the Black and ethnic minority population than England which differs both in population size and composition. Scotland’s brand of civic nationalism also differs from types of nationalism found elsewhere in the UK. This variance is evidenced by Asian electoral support for the Scottish National Party. Most notably, the author makes the point that although immigration is a reserved issue for which Westminster retains responsibility, the distinct differences found within Scotland’s legal, education, health and social work systems may play a key role in how matters of equality and diversity are experienced within Scottish society. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book
McKenna (2006) Equality in Moray: Research into equalities policy and practice This study explores issues of policy and practice related to gender, disability and race equalities within Moray. It provides a considerable amount of detail on access to employment and the service needs of Moray’s established minority ethnic communities and new migrants. The study analyses findings within the context of regional racial equality policy objectives. The analysis examines reported incidents of racism, consultations with minority ethnic communities, interviews with migrant workers and a public survey conducted via the Moray Citizens Panel. The report underlines the increasing diversity of Moray’s population, identifying new migrant communities such as Polish, Portuguese and the particular Russian language translation needs of Latvian Russian speakers. Part of the research process involved reaching out to the local Chinese community, which as Moray’s largest established minority, had not previously been involved in any community planning process. Read More Visit site Free Moray Public sector