Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Hickman, Crowley, Mai (2008), Immigration and social cohesion in the UK The rhythms and realities of everyday life This research set out to improve our understanding of the relationship between new immigration and social cohesion by exploring the rhythms and realities of everyday life of both the long-term settled and new arrival residents. The research is based on the premise that everyday realities in the UK are under pressure from the forces of individualisation, globalisation and post-industrialism, which structure the lives of the long-term settled and new immigrants alike. We aimed to investigate the strategies people deployed, in a time of far-reaching changes, to meet their perceived priorities and needs. In current public debates, there is an association made between increasing ethnic and religious diversity and the erosion of social cohesion. However, recent research has shown that age, class and where we live are far more important in shaping life chances than are ethnicity or religion and that the arrival of new migrant groups did not coincide with an increase in crime. We explored the relations between and within long-term resident and new arrival groups and the impact of social and economic transformations in six sites across the UK: • England:Leicester; • England: London, Downham; • England: London, Kilburn; • England: Peterborough and Thetford; • Northern Ireland: Dungannon; • Scotland:Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free UK Research Report
McCollum et al. (2014) Public attitudes towards migration in Scotland: Exceptionality and possible policy implications McCollum et al. (2014) challenge the common perception that Scots are more welcoming to migrants than their UK counterparts: a view often upheld by Scottish politicians against the political backdrop of the Scottish and UK Governments’ divergence on immigration policy. Although the authors do find evidence of favourable attitudes towards migration among the Scottish public (these attitudes are perhaps explained by historic immigration and emigration to and from Scotland) they also highlight emerging attitudes of opposition to migration. As the authors point out, such findings clearly have implications for policy debates on future immigration and constitutional change in Scotland. For further studies on attitudes to discrimination in Scotland see Bromley et al. (2007) and Lewis (2006) who examines Scottish attitudes towards asylum seekers and refugees. Also see Scottish Government (2013b) which provides a review of equality and ethnicity issues and includes discussion of attitudes to racial discrimination. Tindal et al. (2014b) discuss immigration policy and constitutional change from the perspective of Scottish employers and industry. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, UK Academic journal
Mulvey (2010) When policy creates politics: The problematizing of immigration and the consequences for refugee integration This article by Mulvey (2010) presents the argument that the problems of integration for migrants, in particular asylum seekers and refugees, stems from a hostile political environment. The author contends that asylum seekers were firstly constructed as a threat by way of New Labour asylum policy and associated rhetoric that accompanied policy-making – such construction presented immigration as a problem and in turn created a sense of crisis within the domain of policy making – in turn the author argues, the crisis then fostered hostility within the general population towards migrants. This article clearly highlights the importance of the consideration of context in examining the policy-making processes of Government, and that the way policy is made is central to how it is subsequently received by the public. See also Bowes et al. (2008) for another study which assesses asylum policy and asylum experiences in a Scottish context, and Lewis (2006) who examines attitudes found within Scotland towards asylum seekers and refugees. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, Asylum seeker UK Journal article
Schleef et al. (2011) Teenagers acquisition of variation: A comparison of locally-born and migrant teens realisation of English (ing) in Edinburgh and London Schleef et al. (2011) give a fascinating insight into Polish migrant teenagers’ acquisition of English. The authors examine how the teenagers acquire local English speech variations. With case study sites in London and Edinburgh, the study finds that Polish adolescents absorb and replicate the variations of English they hear from their local-born peers. This phenomenon occurs in both cities. Interestingly, in some cases, the Polish teenagers also introduce new variations into the speech of their locally-born peers. The study reflects a consequence of the significant numbers of Polish migrants to the UK. The research also raises questions that are applicable to other non-English speaking migrant groups and, for studies concerned with how migrants learn and interact using the English language at a local level. Read More Visit site £ EU City of Edinburgh, England Journal article
The Improvement Service (2012) Elected Member Briefing Note No.15: Migration The Improvement Service Briefing Note on the topic of migration, developed by COSLA Strategic Migration Partnership, is primarily designed to provide local government elected members with an accessible information resource providing clarification of some key definitions and terminology. The note also gives an overview of migration in the UK and Scotland. In addition, relevant statistical data is provided along with an outline of some of the impacts of migration and evidence to counter some of the supposedly negative consequences of migration, for example, the strain placed on the welfare and benefits system, public services or employment and wages. Some analysis of public opinion towards migration is also provided. The analysis highlights the current saliency of the topic in the UK and gives a brief outline of current political positions on immigration. While the document is intended for briefing elected members, it is nonetheless a compact and useful account which summarises key points regarding migration to Scotland. It is, therefore, of potential benefit to a wider audience. Read More Visit site Free UK, Scotland Public sector