Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Hopkins (2007b) Global events, national politics, local lives: young Muslim men in Scotland Hopkins’ (2007b) study challenges the notion that Scotland’s youth are disengaged from mainstream politics. In so doing, it highlights the specific experiences of young Muslim men living within Scotland’s urban areas, placing their lives within a global context which takes events post 9/11 into account. One of the particular strengths of this study is the emphasis placed on the views of young Muslim men, which gives them a principal voice in the analysis. This study builds effectively on some of the authors’ earlier work, see for example Hopkins (2004) which examines the complex issue of national identity for young Scottish Muslim men in our post 9/11 era, Hopkins (2007a) for a study on the importance of global connections to young Scottish Muslim men and Hopkins (2009) for a study focussing on the experience of young Muslim men in Edinburgh and Glasgow within the context of debates around masculinity. Read More Visit site Free Scotland Journal article
McCollum et al. (2014) Public attitudes towards migration in Scotland: Exceptionality and possible policy implications McCollum et al. (2014) challenge the common perception that Scots are more welcoming to migrants than their UK counterparts: a view often upheld by Scottish politicians against the political backdrop of the Scottish and UK Governments’ divergence on immigration policy. Although the authors do find evidence of favourable attitudes towards migration among the Scottish public (these attitudes are perhaps explained by historic immigration and emigration to and from Scotland) they also highlight emerging attitudes of opposition to migration. As the authors point out, such findings clearly have implications for policy debates on future immigration and constitutional change in Scotland. For further studies on attitudes to discrimination in Scotland see Bromley et al. (2007) and Lewis (2006) who examines Scottish attitudes towards asylum seekers and refugees. Also see Scottish Government (2013b) which provides a review of equality and ethnicity issues and includes discussion of attitudes to racial discrimination. Tindal et al. (2014b) discuss immigration policy and constitutional change from the perspective of Scottish employers and industry. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, UK Academic journal
Shubin (2011) “Where Can a Gypsy Stop?” Rethinking mobility in Scotland Shubin (2011) provides a socio-cultural study examining how access and participation within Scottish society is impacted on by Scottish Travellers’ itinerant lifestyle. In addition, the research looks at how the Traveller way of life is portrayed. Moves to accommodate the practice of Scotland’s Traveller community (both politically and economically) are assessed through analysis of empirical research findings. As a result, Shubin (2011) is able to examine how general understandings of Traveller practice neglect key elements of their nomadic way of life. Formal definitions of travel are found to be constrictive and serve only to perpetuate Traveller marginalisation. For further studies on mobility and exclusion, see Shubin (2012a), Shubin (2012b) and Shubin and Dickey (2013). Also see Bromley et al. (2007) on Scottish attitudes to discrimination, de Lima et al. (2011) includes consideration of Traveller ethnicity within a study of ethnicity and poverty and Deuchar and Bhopal (2013) discuss how marginalisation of Traveller children can be addressed within the school environment. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article