Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

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Bowes et al. (1990b) Racism and harassment of Asians in Glasgow Although a study of racism during the late nineteen eighties, Bowes et al (1990b) combine case-study methodology and survey data to provide analysis of both institutional and interpersonal racism as experienced by the Asian community in Glasgow and considers those experiences within a wider Scottish context. With a focus on the policies of the Housing Department of the then Glasgow District Council, the paper begins with a interesting discussion of the use of central terms, which allows the authors to present an explanation for their use of the term ‘racial harassment’ in preference to that of ‘racist harassment’. Overall, the study found a general lack of enforcement rendered anti-racist measures ineffective when it came to addressing institutional racism. See also Bowes et al (1990a) for a study dating from the same period which also considered issues faced by Glasgow’s ethnic minority communities in relation to council housing. Read More Visit site £ Glasgow City Journal article
Hopkins (2008) Race, nation and politics: the difference that Scotland makes Hopkins (2008) draws attention to the distinct differences found in Scotland on matters of race and racism and contrasts these with the views held elsewhere in the United Kingdom. In a review of past research, the author firstly outlines the similarities that can be found within both the Scottish and UK contexts prior to highlighting differences that are evident. One of the key differences found is that of diversity. Scotland is home to far less diversity and distribution within the Black and ethnic minority population than England which differs both in population size and composition. Scotland’s brand of civic nationalism also differs from types of nationalism found elsewhere in the UK. This variance is evidenced by Asian electoral support for the Scottish National Party. Most notably, the author makes the point that although immigration is a reserved issue for which Westminster retains responsibility, the distinct differences found within Scotland’s legal, education, health and social work systems may play a key role in how matters of equality and diversity are experienced within Scottish society. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book