Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Danson and Jentsch (2009) The new Scottish rural labour market: processes of inclusion and exclusion Defining ‘rural’ as a settlement comprising a population of less than 3,000 people, Danson and Jentsch (2009) consider past debate surrounding the rural labour market. Previously, this market had been concerned with outward migration of Scotland’s youth in search of better employment opportunities. Danson and Jentsch update this understanding, providing a contemporary perspective that takes account of the dynamics of current inward migration to rural Scotland. Their analysis of the labour market and rural migration touches on the contrasting experiences of inclusion and exclusion. On one hand migrant workers are viewed as valued employees who help to sustain rural communities. On the other hand, they experience public negativity in terms of housing allocation and competition for employment. In essence, the authors contend that rather than developing policy centred on particular social groups, policy should be developed to address the issues that surround processes of labour market exclusion. See related studies such as Danson and Jentsch (2012); de Lima (2012); de Lima and Wright (2009). Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book
Danson and Jentsch (2012) International migration and economic participation in small towns and rural areas—cross-national evidence Danson and Jentsch (2012) include Scotland (case study of the Outer Hebrides) in their cross-national comparative study of international migration to rural areas (together with the USA, Canada and Ireland). This approach allows them to discuss key themes within a comparative context. The study focuses on migrant experiences related to underemployment, pay and working conditions along with the important influence of welcoming communities for migrant settlement experience. Although chiefly cross-national in scope, the study nonetheless shows that in Scotland’s case, communities are more receptive to migrants in areas which have previously experienced sustained out-migration. In both rural and urban areas migrant workers are viewed as integral to sustaining some businesses. In turn, this means that migrant workers enjoy high rates of employment – albeit physically demanding work characterised by long or unsociable hours and low pay. The study draws attention to a continuing feature within Scotland; poor matching of migrants’ skills and qualifications with appropriate levels of employment. See also Danson and Jentsch (2009) which examines processes of inclusion and exclusion within the rural Scottish labour market. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, USA, Canada, Ireland Journal article
de Lima (2010) Boundary crossings: Migration, belonging/‘un-belonging’ in rural Scotland With migration seen as a means of tackling rural population decline, de Lima (2010) challenges the perception of rural areas as being both devoid of migration and culturally homogenous. He contrasts this view with perceptions of municipal landscapes as cosmopolitan in outlook and the only locations where ethnic minorities can be found in Scotland. The study provides an intriguing account of identity and the sense of belonging held by international migrants to Scotland’s rural areas. The study is also an examination of the fluidity and plurality found within rural spaces, which also introduces the reader to the concept of ‘translocalism’. For additional studies on migrant labour in rural Scotland, also see de Lima and Wright (2009) who also explore both the role and the impact of migrant workers in rural communities, de Lima (2007) which finds migrants to be integral to the rural workforce and, Danson and Jentsch (2009) which focuses on processes on inclusion and exclusion. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Journal article
de Lima (2012) Migration, ‘race’ equality and discrimination: A question of social justice This paper by de Lima (2012) provides an overview of the background to migration discourse in Scotland. Chiefly, the paper considers the economic impact of Scotland’s ageing population. Setting the discussion within a post-devolution context, the author argues that migration policies should not be based solely on economic drivers, but that principles of social justice should also be taken into account. This must be done in order to address both discrimination towards minority groups and the host community worries about threatened livelihoods. See also Rolfe and Metcalf (2009) which highlights migration’s central place in the Scottish Government’s economic strategy and the Scottish Government (2013b) review on equality outcomes, which covers attitudes to racial discrimination. For a study on Scottish public attitudes towards migration see McCollum et al. (2014) and similarly Bromley et al. (2007).Lewis (2006) examines attitudes found in Scotland towards asylum seekers and refugees. Read More Visit site £ Scotland Book