Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Crawford et al. (2012) Migration and health in Glasgow and its relevance to GoWell This report by Crawford et al. (2012) was produced for the collaborative partnership GoWell (See www.gowellonline.com). With a focus on health and Wellbeing;in Glasgow, the study provides a brief historical background, an examination of the impact of migration through areas such as policy, regeneration, legislation and analysis of migration patterns. It also provides interesting detail of ethnic composition and demographic changes within the boundaries of the GoWell study area. The report reviews findings from survey data which report that migrants declare themselves to be in better health than fellow residents within their local community area. The report helps contextualise the GoWell study findings and provides an insightful account of the impact of previous and current migration patterns, the influence of policy, and the effects of migration on health in Glasgow. Read More Visit site Free Glasgow City Public sector
Guillemot and Shubin (2010) Searching jobs for 'better life': Understanding employment mobility and well-being of Eastern European migrants in France and Scotland Guillemot and Shubin (2010) explore both the theoretical and practical issues connected to the employment and well-being of Eastern European migrants in France (Anjou) and Scotland (Aberdeenshire) and questions related concepts and policies on migration and integration. The article covers emerging mobile lifestyles and the subsequent need for social policy to correspondingly adapt and highlights the potential barrier created by EU policies intended to limit migration through focusing on illegal labour and favouring seasonal or highly skilled labour. The authors anticipate that while the possibility of a reduction in the demand for migrant labour and lower employment opportunities emanating from economic instability, may also elicit an increase in xenophobia as witnessed during the 2010 French regional elections. For further studies on Eastern European migrant mobility see Shubin (2012a; 2012b) which consider the influence of faith and the church in the experiences of Eastern European migrant integration; and Shubin and Dickey (2013) who explore the interplay between migrant mobility and employment of Eastern European workers across Scotland. Read More Visit site Free EU Aberdeenshire Academic research
Kearns and Whitley (2010) Health, Wellbeing and social inclusion of migrants in North Glasgow Kearns and Whitely (2010) examine the health, Wellbeing and social inclusion of migrants, refugees and asylum seekers. The authors make a comparison with other residents, particularly within North Glasgow’s regeneration zones. The authors aim to establish whether or not migrants are worse off than the general population and, to identify any need for additional support. The study is based on interpretation of data from the household survey. The authors interpret the data with caution, pointing out that migrant respondents could have a different understanding of the questions being asked or may have been cautious in giving their response. The study finds that although migrants appear to be generally healthy in comparison to other groups surveyed, there is evidence which points to poor social cohesion and harassment is a relatively common experience. What is more, refugees expressed greater concern over their personal safety, while the issue of social isolation were also a cause for anxiety for those seeking asylum. Read More Visit site Free Refugee, Asylum, TCN, EU Glasgow City Public sector
Strang and Quinn (2014) Integration or isolation?: Mapping social connections and well-being amongst refugees in Glasgow Strang and Quinn (2014) explore the social networks and connections of Iranian and Afghan refugee men in Glasgow in relation to understandings of mental health and well-being. Using workshops, presentations, discussion and individual and group tasks along with input from a mental health professional, Strang and Quinn (2014) draw out and map this hard to reach group's range of social bonds, bridges and the links that they utilise alongside their indicated levels of reciprocal relationships and trust. A number of recommendations emerge from the research, notably a need to address the uncertainty of asylum claims along with issues of family reunion, poverty and support for asylum seekers and refugees to enable the development of reciprocal friendships. The research gives a voice to Iranian and Afghan refugees in Scotland, allowing them to openly express their experiences, and ultimately contributes to a better understanding of their circumstances and those of other refugees and asylum seekers in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Glasgow City Public sector