Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Kum et al. (2010) Changing the face of the Scottish teaching profession? The experiences of refugee teachers Building on data gathered as part of the Refugees Into Teaching in Scotland project (See RITeS, 2008) this study by Kum et al. (2010) analyses interview data to explore refugee teachers’ experiences. The research explores the experiences refugee teachers share with non-refugee colleagues alongside points of difference. The study also identifies the barriers refugee teachers have faced in the process of trying to re-enter the teaching profession in Scotland. The authors present the view that, if Scotland is to create a more culturally and linguistically diverse teaching cohort, the sizable barriers faced by refugee teachers need to be overcome. Scotland’s demographic profile is changing due to increased international migration, both from within the European Union and beyond. Thus, the profile of Scotland’s teachers - in line with much of Europe - does not reflect the ethnic diversity found within its contemporary population. The findings from this study clearly have relevance for refugee integration beyond a teaching context. The findings also touch on some of the wider issues associated with international migration such as diversity and globalisation. Read More Visit site £ Refugee Scotland Journal article
RITeS (2008) Refugees Into Teaching in Scotland: Research report This report is the culmination of a two-year period of research conducted as part of the Refugees Into Teaching in Scotland Project (RITeS) which engaged with refugee teachers in the West of Scotland. Although the report recognises the distinction between refugees and asylum seekers, they are not differentiated for the purposes of the study. Instead, the term ‘refugee’ is used throughout the study. The report includes discussion of the demographic profile of refugee teachers and teachers’ experiences and their expectations. There follows an exploration of methodologies and curricula employed in refugee teachers’ countries of origin. This exploration allows the researchers to identify any specific training or support needs that this group of professional migrants may have. The report also provides guidelines on the facilitation of good practice to promote the integration of refugee and asylum seeking professionals in Scotland. Also see the study by Smyth and Kum (2010) which examines the issues faced by teachers who are either refugees or asylum seekers in Scotland. Read More Visit site Free Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Third sector
Smyth and Kum (2010) 'When they don't use it they will lose it': Professionals, deprofessionalization and reprofessionalization: The case of refugee teachers in Scotland This study by Smyth and Kum (2010) examines the issues faced by teachers who are either refugees or seeking asylum in Scotland. The research delivers a valuable insight into their attempts to re-enter the teaching profession in Scotland. The study investigates barriers and discrimination faced by refugee teachers. Notably, barriers are more prevalent for teachers seeking asylum as they are prohibited from undertaking paid employment. The study also highlights the difficulties encountered, and support required, by some refugee teachers attempting to complete the General Teaching Council for Scotland registration process. The authors draw attention to the fact that many refugees, despite being well educated, are often only able to secure unskilled employment. Their access to their profession is impeded and this impacts on refugee teachers’ integration into Scottish society. Also, such impediment deprives Scotland of a diverse teaching cohort. The study’s findings have clear implications for refugees from other professional backgrounds both in Scotland and elsewhere. Also see the report on the same topic by RITeS (2008). Read More Visit site £ Asylum seeker, Refugee Scotland Journal article