Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Hall Aitken (2007) Outer Hebrides migration study: final report Hall Aitken (2007) delivers a substantial report which frames an examination of migration in the Outer Hebrides within a broader context of migration in comparable rural areas; areas that are also characterised by depopulation. The report explores the main causes on both in and out-migration. Consequently, the study draws out policy and practice which could potentially be utilised to encourage in-migration and reduce out-migration from rural areas. In particular, the report recommends establishing a multi-agency partnership to address a range of areas such as enterprise development, housing needs, and engagement with young people along with making those who have already left aware of current opportunities. The recommendations on migrant integration extend to awareness-raising and provision of support for existing communities during the process of integration. The recruitment of migrant outreach workers to the role of intermediaries between migrant workers and agencies is also recommended along with a full assessment of both current and future training needs among migrant workers. Read More Visit site Free Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Public sector
Wells (2012) ESOL in the Hebrides and Island voices–‘Hey, hang on a minute, tha mise bilingual!’ Published in a British Council collection which focuses on English language teaching for migrants and refugees, Wells (2012) presents an intriguing insight into adult education in the Outer Hebrides. The collection as a whole highlights the regional balancing act necessitated by the facts of devolved education versus the UK government’s centralised control of immigration policy. Learning English is of crucial importance for new arrivals to Scotland. The author suggests that rather than being viewed as incompatible, the traditional aspects of local life and the new customs introduced as a result of immigration, can be harnessed to foster ESOL skills. Learning English is central to academic success for migrant children, for adults, learning English and gaining proficiency opens doors, enhances economic security and leads to increased social acceptance and cultural understanding within the host community. Read More Visit site Free Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Public sector