Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Highlands and Islands Enterprise (2009) Young people in the Highlands and Islands: Understanding and influencing the migration choices of young people to and from the Highlands and Islands of Scotland This study commissioned by Highlands and Islands Enterprise, sets out to understand the major factors influencing the choices people make when planning and undertaking relocation within Scotland. The study asks what measures can be taken to influence the choices that young people who are considering migrating (either to, from or within the Highlands and Islands region of Scotland) make. The study was undertaken because, proportionately, the Highlands & Islands has far lower numbers of 15 to 30 year olds in the population than is typical for the Scottish population overall. Consequently, the region is faced with the prospect of an ageing population and a decreasing work-age population. While this research does not focus specifically on foreign migrant workers, nonetheless this group is recognised as important in the context of the region’s economic and demographic development. Thus, foreign migrant workers are given due consideration in the analysis, which identifies education, employment and the environment as key policy areas which require further development. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Moray, Orkney Islands Scottish Government document
Jentsch et al. (2007) Migrant workers in rural Scotland: ‘going to the middle of nowhere’ This paper explores international migration to rural Scotland. The study finds that rural development is crucial for the creation of an environment that is both welcoming and meets the aspirations of migrant workers. Although improvement has been made in attempts to facilitate integration, it is the networks that develop between migrants that are perhaps the most significant factor for their integration. These links allow migrants to benefit from the experience of earlier arrivals. Recruitment agencies can also play a similar – integrative -role. With the experiences of both migrants and employers represented, Jentsch et al. (2007) highlight the lack of high-level employment opportunities as an obstacle to long-term settlement. As has already been seen among the youth in rural communities, migrants too may leave in search of better opportunities. The authors also find debate on migration in Scotland to be less focused on ethnicity, and caution that, should more non-accession state migrants arrive, without an accompanying positive discourse the debate may develop into one that reflects the levels of negativity which surround the issue of migration in the rest of the UK. Read More Visit site Free Highland, Moray, Orkney Islands Journal article