Migration Library search resultsCo-financed by the European Fund for the Integration of Third Country Nationals

Title Summary Links Cost Status Location Resource Type
Danson and Jentsch (2012) International migration and economic participation in small towns and rural areas—cross-national evidence Danson and Jentsch (2012) include Scotland (case study of the Outer Hebrides) in their cross-national comparative study of international migration to rural areas (together with the USA, Canada and Ireland). This approach allows them to discuss key themes within a comparative context. The study focuses on migrant experiences related to underemployment, pay and working conditions along with the important influence of welcoming communities for migrant settlement experience. Although chiefly cross-national in scope, the study nonetheless shows that in Scotland’s case, communities are more receptive to migrants in areas which have previously experienced sustained out-migration. In both rural and urban areas migrant workers are viewed as integral to sustaining some businesses. In turn, this means that migrant workers enjoy high rates of employment – albeit physically demanding work characterised by long or unsociable hours and low pay. The study draws attention to a continuing feature within Scotland; poor matching of migrants’ skills and qualifications with appropriate levels of employment. See also Danson and Jentsch (2009) which examines processes of inclusion and exclusion within the rural Scottish labour market. Read More Visit site Free Scotland, USA, Canada, Ireland Journal article
Molnár (2011) The integration process of immigrants in Scotland, UK and in Washington Molnár (2011) provides a comparative study of migrant integration, focusing on the experiences of migrants moving from former Soviet Union countries to the UK (Scotland) and the USA (Washington). The researcher gathered survey data from questionnaires completed by both migrants and local participants within the host countries, in conjunction with interviews with both migrants and local authorities, to closely examine the integration process. The study provides an interesting account of how such integration processes and acculturation are impacted on by the attitudes and characteristics of the host society but also of the attitudes of migrants themselves. As such, the author argues such factors can play a significant positive or negative role for individuals during the period of integration. This comparative study clearly demonstrates both that integration is a complex phenomenon and the important place immigration holds within contemporary societies throughout the world, accompanied by subsequent benefits and tensions. Read More Visit site Free TCN Scotland, USA Book